Pierson officers say the vaccine just isn’t accessible to predominantly Spanish farmers

The predominantly Hispanic farming community of Pierson has a lot of people 65 and over, but Councilor Sergia Cardenas doesn’t know a single person who has been vaccinated: “There’s no information about it here and they think because they’re For Hispanic immigrants, they’re not Eligible, ”said Cardenas. Fear of the government is one of the reasons Cardenas believes the essential workers who work in the fields are not protected from COVID-19, but she says there are many others out there too. “It’s not accessible. Transportation is also a bigger problem, ”said Cardenas. There are no Publix, Winn-Dixie, CVS, or Walmart locations in the region. The county health department’s premises on the Volusia County Fairgrounds in DeLand are more than 30 miles away. “It is more difficult for them, they have no flexible working hours, no childcare. It’s not feasible for them, ”said Cardenas. Technology is also a stumbling block. Vaccine appointments are mostly booked through congested websites where speed and computer skills are critical. In Pierson and neighboring Seville, internet service is incomplete and access to computers is restricted. There is also a language barrier. The city officials have contacted the Volusia County Ministry of Health and are working to bring a local vaccination event to the community. Doses could be given in the city park, but nothing is set in stone yet. Cardenas, who happens to be the first Hispanic and the first woman to be elected to the city council, says COVID-19 is in the community and is largely treated with home remedies. “They’re scared of the big bills, they don’t go to the clinics. You don’t go to the doctors, ”said Cardenas. She hopes her constituents will get the vaccine at some point, but says herd immunity will be a challenge.

The predominantly Hispanic farming community of Pierson has many people 65 years of age and older, but Councilor Sergia Cardenas does not know of a single person who has been vaccinated.

“There’s no information about it here and they think because they are Hispanic immigrants they are not eligible,” Cardenas said.

Fear of the government is one of the reasons Cardenas believes the essential workers who work in the fields are not protected from COVID-19, but she says there are many others out there too.

“It’s not accessible. Transportation is also a bigger problem, ”said Cardenas.

There are no Publix, Winn-Dixie, CVS, or Walmart locations in the region. The county health department’s premises on the Volusia County Fairgrounds in DeLand are more than 30 miles away.

“It is more difficult for them, they have no flexible working hours, no childcare. It’s not feasible for them, ”said Cardenas.

Technology is also a stumbling block. Vaccine appointments are mostly booked through congested websites where speed and computer skills are critical. In Pierson and neighboring Seville, internet service is incomplete and access to computers is restricted. There is also a language barrier.

The city guides have contacted the Volusia County Ministry of Health and are working to bring a local vaccination event to the community. Doses could be given in the city park, but nothing is set in stone yet.

Cardenas, who happens to be the first Hispanic and the first woman to be elected to the city council, says COVID-19 is in the community and mostly treated with home remedies.

“They’re afraid of the big bills, they don’t go to the clinics. You don’t go to the doctors, ”said Cardenas.

She hopes her constituents will get the vaccine at some point, but says herd immunity will be a challenge.

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