Dozens of Mississippi, Alabama Properties Broken As Twister Outbreak Continues | The climate channel – Article from the climate channel

  • The outbreak continues.
  • Shelters and security rooms are open.
  • Anyone on their way to severe weather should closely monitor the conditions.

Dozens of homes are damaged and trees and power lines tumbled as a dangerous tornado erupted in the deep south.

There were no immediate reports of injuries.

According to poweroutage.us, around 30,000 households and businesses in Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi were without electricity by around 4:30 p.m. CDT.

There had been at least a dozen reports of tornadoes by early Wednesday evening.

(MORE: Latest forecast of the severe weather outbreak)

A video from Moundville, Alabama, near Tuscaloosa showed a tree blocking a road and several houses with holes in their roofs. According to a local media report quoting Hale County’s emergency management services, 20 to 30 homes in the area were damaged, mostly minor.

Tamara Croom, assistant director of emergency management in the adjacent Tuscaloosa COunty, told weather.com Wednesday evening that some residents in the Moundville area have been evicted. Most of the damage was on roofs, Croom said.

Photos posted on social media showed a house that appeared to have collapsed in Autauga County, Alabama, northwest Montgomery.

According to WBRC-TV, an animal shelter in Tuscaloosa full of people. The students also crowded into an animal shelter at the University of Alabama, where the students were instructed to remain in a safe place until at least 4:15 CDT.

A dispatcher in Wayne County, Mississippi, told weather.com Wednesday afternoon that several homes and chicken houses in the county, about 60 miles northeast of Hattiesburg and near the Alabama state line, were damaged. Officials could not be on site due to persistent storms, so the extent of the damage was unknown.

Shortly after noon CDT, a tornado landed in the county.

A video shot in Wayne County and shared on social media showed debris flying in the air.

A photo shared by WLBT-TV showed damaged agricultural structures.

The storms come when the NOAA Storm Prediction Center released a tornado clock for “particularly dangerous situations” from central and southern Mississippi to western and central Alabama by 7pm CDT. These include Jackson, Hattiesburg, and Meridian in Mississippi, and Birmingham and Tuscaloosa in Alabama.

This type of tornado watch is rarely issued and means numerous powerful tornadoes are expected.

Several other areas are also threatened.

Officials in Hattiesburg announced that all city offices would close at 2 p.m. CDT.

“Today is a very serious day,” said Mayor Toby Barker in a briefing on Wednesday morning.

“Today is really a day to focus on the weather. And even until tonight,” said Glenn Moore, director of the Forrest County Emergency Management Agency, which includes Hattiesburg.

Several shelters and security rooms are open across the country.

In Alabama, Governor Kay Ivey declared a state of emergency for all 67 counties in the state before the storms. Schools in several cities and counties were either closed on Wednesday or were only moved to virtual classes, including Birmingham.

COVID-19 vaccination centers have also been closed in several states.

Schools in some parts of Louisiana announced they would fire students early Wednesday afternoon.

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According to weather.com meteorologists, dangerous storms are expected to continue in the deep south until Wednesday evening, with the potential for intense long-haul tornadoes, noxious winds and large hailstones. This could be the middle of the night.

Anyone on the potential storm path should closely monitor all forecasts, guards and warnings, be ready to seek shelter immediately, and have multiple options for receiving severe weather warnings.

That tin roof was blown away from a building in high winds in the Woolworth Township of northeast Lincoln County, Miss., Wednesday March 17, 2021.  Forecasters believe severe weather is expected on Wednesday with the potential for massive tornadoes, downpours, and hail the size of tennis balls.  (Brett Campbell / The Daily Leader)

That tin roof was blown away from a building in high winds in the Woolworth Township of northeast Lincoln County, Miss., Wednesday March 17, 2021. Forecasters believe severe weather is expected on Wednesday with the potential for massive tornadoes, downpours, and hail the size of tennis balls. (Brett Campbell / The Daily Leader)

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to cover breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

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